Adoption Information

Assistance for Adoptive Families

There are many resources and supports available to assist families with their decision to adopt.

Adoption Subsidy

Some of the children who are adopted through Child Welfare are considered children with "special needs.” 
Special needs, as defined by the Department of Children and Families includes:

                - a child who has one or more special needs as a result of a mental, emotional or physical impairment,
behavioral disorder, or medical condition that has been diagnosed by a licensed professional who is qualified to
make the diagnosis;

                - a child who is a member of a sibling group of 2 to be adopted together and one of the children is 8
years of age or older;

                - a child is a member of a sibling group of 3 or more to be adopted together;

                - a child is a member of an ethnic or cultural minority of whom reasonable, but unsuccessful efforts to
place the child in an adoptive home were made and documented;

                - The child’s birth and/or family history places the child at risk of having special needs but, due to the
child’s age, a reliable diagnosis cannot be made.

                Adoption subsidies are available to parents who adopt children who have physical or mental
disabilities, or severe emotional problems. In addition to those children who qualify for subsidy through the
Federal Title IV-E Adoption Assistance program, state subsidies are available to offset the additional costs of
caring for a child with special needs. The subsidy programs are intended to remove financial barriers to the
adoption of children with special needs, but they are not intended to cover the full cost of raising a child. The
amount of the subsidy cannot be greater than the amount that child would have received had the child remained
in a family-based foster care setting. The benefits available through the adoption subsidy programs are
determined on an individual basis and may include monthly care and maintenance payments (a daily rate),
health insurance coverage.

Adoption Tax Credit

                In the summer of 2001, the Federal Adoption Tax Credit was updated. The most important update
was to expand benefits to children with special needs adopted from the U.S. foster care system. Originally
families adopting from the foster care system could claim the adoption tax credit, provided they had qualifying
expenses. Unfortunately, the IRS list of qualifying expenses was limited to the cost of the adoption process, but
not the day-to-day costs of raising a child with special needs. However, beginning in tax year 2003, families
adopting a child with special needs from foster care, had access to this same tax credit without needing to
document expenses. Since tax year 2005, the tax credit is $10,630 and you have the current year and up to
the next five years in which to use it. For families that adopted in 2002 or earlier, you can only claim the credit
against expenses you paid related to the adoption process.

                If you have questions on the adoption tax credit, contact the North American Council on Adoptable
Children at 651-644-3036 or adoption.assistance@nacac.org. You can also visit the IRS website at
http://www.irs.gov/
 or call 1-800-829-1040.

Employee Benefits

                Employer adoption benefits may include reimbursement for costs, paid or unpaid time-off and other
support services. For more information contact the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption at 1-877-777-4222 or 
info@adoptionfriendlyworkplace.org
 or visit their website at www.adoptionfriendlyworkplace.org. You can also
talk to your employer.

 

 
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