All About Adoption

All About Adoption

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There are many elements that go into the adoption process, including but not limited to research. It is no secret that the internet can be a wonderful tool for obtaining quick information. However, it is also useful for obtaining valuable advice and personal perspectives of adoption. For further information, visit these links regarding topics such as teens and adoption, success tools for adoptive parents, a comparison of adoption types, and why you’re not getting an adoption match. 1.) Teens & Adoption http://creatingafamily.org/adoption-category/adopted-teens-talk-about-adoption-family-identity/ 2.) Success Tools: Adoptive Parents http://creatingafamily.org/adoption-category/twenty-things-adoptive-parents-need-to-succeed/ 3.) Comparing Types of Adoption http://creatingafamily.org/adoption-category/comparison-chart-three-major-types-adoption/ 4.) Why You’re Not Getting an Adoption Match http://creatingafamily.org/adoption-category/reasons-adopt-faster/  

Making Halloween Happier

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By Tracy Dee Whitt www.lovinadoptin.com How do we stay sane during Halloween? It can be hard, even with kids who don’t have sensory issues, or attachment issues. The first goal is to make it fun for your child. For children with attachment issues, I don’t agree with the approach of removing everything fun in their life. If there’s no fun, there are no opportunities to grow as a family, nor do they feel they will ever get to do anything, so why try to be good? Let them do something for Halloween, and I don’t just mean attending a school party. Even though you’re letting your child participate in Halloween, that doesn’t mean all expectations go out to the trash with the candy wrappers. Have guidelines before you go out; what you will be doing, what you expect them to do, and how you expect them to act. That doesn’t

Words of Wisdom From an Adoptive Couple

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From my vantage point as an adoptive mom of three siblings (now ages 7, 10 and 11) who were placed with us for adoption 18 months ago, I have two messages for those who are at any point in the adoption process: It’s worth the waiting and the hard work Life does get easier My husband, Jack and I talked about adopting for almost 10 years before we finally made the choice to become parents, chose A Family for Every Child and started the home study process.  During that time Jack even went back to school to become a nurse so he could support our family and I could be a stay-at-home mom.  Most of our waiting was during those years of school and making the decision to be parents because we were blessed to be chosen at our first committee, within just a few months of our home study

Indiana to pay adoption subsidies to 1,800 families

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By: Marisa Kwiatkowski, The Indianapolis Star Families that have adopted special-needs children from Indiana’s foster-care system since 2009 will finally receive state adoption subsidies, officials announced Tuesday. Mary Beth Bonaventura, director of the Indiana Department of Child Services, said about 1,800 additional families will receive such payments retroactive to July 1, the start of the state’s fiscal year. The payments are meant to provide financial support to families that adopt foster children with more extensive needs. Gov. Mike Pence on Tuesday authorized DCS to pay subsidies to every family on its wait list and every family that adopts a special-needs foster child in the current fiscal year, at a cost of about $10 million, Bonaventura said. “I’m excited,” she said. “This is a great day for children and families that adopt them.” Indiana hasn’t paid state adoption subsidies to any new families since 2009, when the burden for funding the program

The Call That Changed Our Lives

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In 1997 a speaker from the Mississippi Baptist Children’s Village came to address our church congregation on orphan ministry opportunities in our community. My wife and I had no prior knowledge and had given little thought about opening our home to help other people’s children. Our hearts were deeply touched by the stories the speaker recounted. Immediately after the service my wife and I began to consider becoming involved as an extended family to local children from the village. The children at the village are not adoptable as the purpose of the ministry was to provide a safe Christian temporary environment for children whose parents for a variety of reasons (incarceration, drug treatment, financial) could not care for their own kids. What the ministry needed was families to qualify and be trained as ‘extended families’ providing weekend, holiday and summer foster care for the children so they did not have

Every Adoption Experience is Unique

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Every adoption experience is unique; it is never possible to anticipate exactly what it will be like. The processes and requirements for adoption can be complicated, and adoption, though ultimately rewarding, can at times be an emotional roller coaster for parents and children alike. With its Matching Assistance Program and other resources, A Family For Every Child tries to help families persist through these frustrations, to stay hopeful, and to keep believing that the rewards in the end will be well worth it. Here is one family’s story about the ups and downs of the adoption process, and how it all turned out: Written by an adoptive mom. “After being in the final selection process more than twice, getting very excited to meet our newest family members, and then being told we were not selected, it was hard to be positive some days.  But, we kept at the process, submitting

We Had Love to Offer, Why Not Help a Child?

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We all have the capacity to love. Not just the capacity, but the need to love and to be loved. It is at the heart of what it means to be human. The heart of humanity is designed for love. It cannot function properly without it. Yet, to love at all is risky. When we offer our hearts to something or someone, we also accept the inevitability of loss. There is no greater pain in life than a broken heart. To open our hearts to anything is to open ourselves to the possibility of pain. The only way to properly avoid pain is to protect the heart from the dangers of love. But can we afford that option? To refuse to love is to sentence the heart to an early grave. Protection from pain takes a huge toll on the heart. Bitterness sets in and the heart becomes a stone

What a Forever Family Means

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Forever FamiliesI dreamed about my forever family for a long time.  Where I would live, what my room would look like, what my family would be like.However, getting a new family  meant I would be getting more than just a new set of parents:A new set of family rules and boundaries to follow.A new group of friends.Maybe a new school and a new town.Even a new bedtime or pets! It was a little scary…All the new stuff, including my forever family members, was a lot to get used to. Remember to be honest about your feelings with your new parent (s) and to think of things that would help you feel more comfortable. Your ideas matter!Do I have to love my new family immediately?I was nervous about having to love my new family immediately. I was also not sure what to call my new parent (s). Don’t worry, you will know