The Basics on Foster Care

The Basics on Foster Care

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There is an abundance of information on the internet regarding practically any topic one can think of. The information about foster care available on the internet is plentiful and easy to access for perspective foster parents, foster children, individuals seeking volunteer opportunities, and more. Here is a list of websites to visit as a starting point for a research trail on foster care: 1.) “Resources for the Community” at childwelfare.gov Every May, or National Foster Care Month, childwelfare.org posts a list of resources for people to learn more about foster care. These lists include information on how to become a foster parent, as well as how to contribute to the positive development of children in the foster care system. For 2015, look for article titles such as, “Becoming a Foster Parent” from the National Foster Parent Association, “Is Fostering a Good Fit For Us? Things To Consider” from the Foster Care

See The Faces of Foster Care

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A slideshow published by The New York Times that provides an inside look at the various “faces” of foster care. This piece of multimedia work looks at the foster children population of California. Nine different faces are showcased describing their background in foster care and where they are in their lives today. http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2013/11/03/education/edlife/20131103FOSTER-10.html

How to Help Foster Children in Your Community

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Often the holiday season is associated with volunteer work and the generosity of individuals to help their communities. However, the need for volunteers, donations, and more exists 365 days of the year, and with so many options to choose from, giving back, particularly to foster children, is easier than ever. This back to school season check out the number of donation drives that are available nationwide, as well as locally in the Eugene area. 1.) Bring any donations that include school supplies, athletic shoes and apparel for physical education classes, and other clothing for the back to school season to any Sleep Country in the Northwest. More than 20,000 children in Oregon and Washington find themselves in the foster care system and many enter with few possessions. Visit http://www.sleepcountry.com/sleep-country-foster-kids.html for more information. 2.) With treehouseforkids.org, the opportunity to create and host your own back to school donation drive is readily available. As

What Foster Parents Wish Other People Knew

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 Blogger Sharon Astyk compiles an honest list confronting misconceptions regarding foster parents and foster children, as well as provides advice in reference to the proper behavior towards the foster care system as a whole. Her recent article “What Foster Parents Wish Other People Knew” works to relate to the foster parent population while reaching out and educating a new audience.By: Sharon Astyk”This essay is a little different than most of my stuff. It is the result of a collaborative discussion on a foster parenting list I’m a part of by a group of foster parents.  I’ve paraphrased and borrowed and added some things of my own, but this is truly collaborative piece, and meant to be shared.  I do NOT have to get credit for it.  So if you’d like to circulate it, use it in a training, distribute it at foster-awareness day, hang it on the wall, run it

Making Halloween Happier

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By Tracy Dee Whitt www.lovinadoptin.com How do we stay sane during Halloween? It can be hard, even with kids who don’t have sensory issues, or attachment issues. The first goal is to make it fun for your child. For children with attachment issues, I don’t agree with the approach of removing everything fun in their life. If there’s no fun, there are no opportunities to grow as a family, nor do they feel they will ever get to do anything, so why try to be good? Let them do something for Halloween, and I don’t just mean attending a school party. Even though you’re letting your child participate in Halloween, that doesn’t mean all expectations go out to the trash with the candy wrappers. Have guidelines before you go out; what you will be doing, what you expect them to do, and how you expect them to act. That doesn’t

A Year in the Life of a Foster Mom

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It is the beginning of spring. The cherry trees that flank Bakersfield’s monolithic Department of Human Services building are blooming. As visitors approach the lobby doors, the fragrant white blossoms offer a final moment of solace, a peace before the storm. Inside, the din of screaming infants and toddlers makes it difficult to hear. Social workers stream through a code-protected door, shuttling to and from visiting rooms with parents and children in tow. You can judge the quality of a just-ended visit by the rigidness of a social worker’s face. Here, there are few reasons to smile. In Room 17A, a small reunion is commencing. Teisha Montal is holding baby boy Jedidiah, only 3 weeks old, for the first time since he was taken from her last week on neglect charges. This is the third child taken away from her; the first two she never got back. Here, in a