Live Generously…

Live Generously…

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On November 13, 2014 A Family For Every Child will host its annual event  A Home for the Holidays Gala.  The evening will consist of dinner, wine, oral auction, silent auction, dessert dash and wine wall.  It will be an evening of celebration, but it is most definitely an evening with a well defined purpose.  In this one night alone we hope to raise up to one third of our operating budget. We cannot function without the generosity of our community of donors and supporters. We operate with the mindset that one person cannot do everything, but everyone can do something. Our goal is to find permanent homes for children in foster care.  Our desire is to make a difference by changing the life of one child at a time. What can you do? Buy a ticket?  Sponsor a table?  Make a donation? Attached is a YouTube video of an

Indiana to pay adoption subsidies to 1,800 families

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By: Marisa Kwiatkowski, The Indianapolis Star Families that have adopted special-needs children from Indiana’s foster-care system since 2009 will finally receive state adoption subsidies, officials announced Tuesday. Mary Beth Bonaventura, director of the Indiana Department of Child Services, said about 1,800 additional families will receive such payments retroactive to July 1, the start of the state’s fiscal year. The payments are meant to provide financial support to families that adopt foster children with more extensive needs. Gov. Mike Pence on Tuesday authorized DCS to pay subsidies to every family on its wait list and every family that adopts a special-needs foster child in the current fiscal year, at a cost of about $10 million, Bonaventura said. “I’m excited,” she said. “This is a great day for children and families that adopt them.” Indiana hasn’t paid state adoption subsidies to any new families since 2009, when the burden for funding the program

Do Something

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When we see the need around us, all around us, we must ask ourselves the question, “What are we going to do about it?” “Several years ago, when singer/songwriter Matthew West invited people to share their stories to serve as inspiration for an upcoming album, he had no idea it would be the start of an amazing journey that would forever change his music, ministry and life. Armed with more than 10,000 stories from fans all over the world, the floodgates of inspiration opened and West crafted a landmark album, The Story of Your Life. Suddenly people were given a voice and a chance for their stories to be heard. It started a powerful wave that continues with even greater momentum on West’s new album Into the Light. “Do Something” was inspired by 20-year-old college student who is changing the world. “She went to Uganda for a semester to study

The Rewards of Being a Mentor

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One of the many successful programs administered by A Family For Every Child is the mentor program.  Its purpose is to place foster children with a loving, supportive and fun mentor.  The rewards are numerous and the children are not the only one’s blessed by the experience.  Here is a story written by a mentor: In 2009, my boys were grown up and gone, and I was feeling like I had missed out not having a little girl. I went to an event for A Family For Every Child and saw some pictures of children who wanted mentors. There was a young girl who lived in my neighborhood with her foster family. I signed up right away. When I met Shelley, she was twelve years old and living in a foster home with three other girls. The four of them all shared a room. Shelley wanted to learn to ride

Voices Behind Our Heart Gallery

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The following story is taken from Lane DeGregory, Times staff writer When the fighting would start, Justice Smith would sneak into her little brothers’ room to tell them everything was going to be okay. She was only 8 then, but she knew what to do: put in a Scooby-Doo movie, turn the TV up real loud so the boys couldn’t hear their mother and her boyfriend screaming. Then Justice would crawl into the bottom bunk and hold Max, the baby, until he fell asleep. Justice has three younger brothers, and for most of her life, she has been their mom. When social workers took the four children away from their mother and sent them to separate foster homes, Justice was 10. Losing her little brothers, she says, was worse than losing her mother. Now she is 13 and living in New Port Richey with a foster couple — and all of

We All Must Do Our Part

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The statistics on child abuse in the US are staggering and horrifying.  There is no way to sugarcoat the hard reality that in our country more than four children die every day as a result of child abuse (www.childhelp.org).   How can this happen?  We are a country founded on the declaration that “all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”  Yet, the most vulnerable in our society are being neglected and mistreated by the very ones who are called to love and protect them.  What can be done to help these children?  Is it solely the job of the State to care for these forgotten children? Can the epidemic of child abuse and neglect be tackled by any one program or agency?  Father Steve Anderson, priest at Holy Redeemer in Flint,

Our Need For Community

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We were made for relationship.  We were made for family.  We were made to thrive within the security of community.  We were never meant to journey through this life alone.  Yet, so many people find themselves in exactly that position, and nothing can be more terrifying than being alone as a new parent.  Especially when the birth of your child comes in the midst of your own bad decisions. Today’s story comes from Coos Bay, Oregon by Tyler Richardson from The World.  This story does not begin on a positive note as the first sentence is as follows, “A day before giving birth to her son, Linn Thomas took her last hit of methamphetamine” (Richardson).  Upon the birth of her child, Linn Thomas discovered that she would not be able to take her baby home from the hospital.  This was due to her erratic lifestyle and probable inability to raise