Family Preservation Program

There are families in our community at risk for child abuse and/or neglect. These families need guidance to move on from the past and into the next chapter of their lives, learning how to make positive changes for themselves and their families.

What is the FAMILY PRESERVATION PROGRAM?

AFFEC's Family Preservation Program focuses on keeping the family unit together. We believe these early and often preventative steps can make the difference between a family successfully parenting their children and losing them to the foster care system. Effective family preservation efforts could keep many children from the trauma of entering foster care. AFFEC utilizes informal (self-referrals and community partners) and formal (DHS) referral processes, as well as AFFEC's own programs to identify families in need.

AFFEC's Family Preservation Program is an intervention and prevention program that is both culturally responsive and community-based. Through this program, parents and their children/youth become empowered to create positive and long term changes for their families.

AFFEC's Family Preservation Program utilizes mutual support (the giving and getting of help). Parent mentors lead by example to achieve personal growth, improve family functioning, and achieve parental and child/youth resilience.

Our Family Preservation and Parent Mentor program works with families to bring about constructive change through support, guidance, instruction and training. The ultimate goal is to maintain children safely at home in order to spare them the trauma of separation.

Keeping the Family Unit Together

Parents are looking for a supportive, non-judgmental environment to learn new parenting strategies and develop leadership and advocacy skills for their families.   AFFEC recognizes the strengths and knowledge of families and the key role they play in the lives of not only their own family members, but in the lives of other families on a similar journey.

AFFEC's Family Preservation Program   is a Parent Mentor Program that supports families connecting with one another throughout the community.   This program pairs parents with trained mentors who can provide support, encouragement, and information on ways to advocate for your child and family.

At present, the Family Preservation program is generally available only in Lane County, Oregon because of budget and resource limitations. We are interested in expanding the program in cost-effective ways; if you or your organization are interested in helping to expand it, please get in touch!

It Takes a Village and Neighbors Help Neighbors

Every day mentors use their time and their gifts to strengthen families and communities. What we are offering is the gift of time; a hand up rather than a handout. Money can help in many different ways as we are all aware; taking time to empower individuals and give them the tools to become better parents to a child who is part of our community is priceless. Many work hard to deal with the challenges of environments where unemployment, violence, and drugs are taking their toll. In the face of these obstacles, community residents look for the connections to vital resources to improve their odds of succeeding. How important and valuable is the simple gift of friendship? How rewarding would it be to pass on valuable life skills to a person or family in need of a hand up to the next step in life?

Parent Mentors

Matches are based on the needs expressed by the family, so each family is able to determine the kind of mentor they need.

We work with families as a team to see to it that the family is provided services and training (e.g., job training, job search assistance, housing, anger management training, and respite care). There is monthly reporting and interaction with all the members of the team. Qualitative outcomes we seek include strengthening parent-child attachment, at risk families and others marginalized by the system. The Parent Mentor Team is made up of clinical staff, case managers and Parent Mentor who provide individual and group treatment to parents, their children and other family members. Services are provided in the family's home as well as in community settings.

00 – Family Finding FAQ

Why would you look for family members when the child was removed from the home?

Children are removed from their home when it is determined that their situations or surroundings are unsafe, and would benefit living elsewhere. This does not mean that their entire family is unsafe, nor that they should be separated from immediate or extended family indefinitely. Family members are often more willing to provide a permanent home and adopt a child relative, as well as keep the child connected with safe people who love them.

Who do you look for?

Everyone! During the Family Finding process volunteers search for relatives, friends, past foster parents, former caseworkers and more. Even if someone is unable to provide a home or be a stable resource for a child, they may know someone who can, and may be able to provide such information.

What if no one is able to adopt the child?

Even if no relative or kith connection identified is able to provide a home for the child, they can likely provide other resources. Individuals may be able to visit with the child, maintain phone contact, become a respite care provider, and more. Studies show that children who maintain contact with safe, loving family members have a greater chance at success. To find a permanent home for a child if a relative is unable to adopt, Extensive Team Recruitment methods are utilized.

What happens after you contact family members?

After family members and others are contacted by the Family Finding Volunteer, the volunteer, Permanency Director, child's caseworker, and DHS Family Finding Coordinator have a meeting to discuss what connections have been contacted and what those conversations have entailed. At that meeting (called the Family Meeting Staffing), a date is set for a Family Meeting, and it is determined what connections will be invited to a Family Meeting.

A Family Meeting is a meeting between the AFFEC volunteer, the Permanency Director, the child's case staff, the DHS Family Finding Coordinator, and the child's family members and kith connections. This meeting focuses on the child's needs, and how those at the table can meet those needs.

After a Family Meeting occurs, AFFEC representatives follow up with family members, connections, and case staff, for a minimum of one year to ensure that the youth establishes emotional and legal permanency.

What is a "kin" connection?

"Kin" refers to family members and relatives of a youth. This includes grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins, in-laws, step relatives, siblings, and the parents. We look for kin connections so that the child can be cared for by family members and reconnect with loved ones. Kin connections can provide support, a home, and be a resource for family reunification. Studies show that children have a better chance at success when living with family members.

What is a "kith" connection?

"Kith" refers to close neighbors, friends, teachers, coaches, mentors, and other connected individuals who may be close to a child. We look for such connections because people connected in this way can support the child and the family, and often love the youth. Kith connections can be some of the strongest connections for family and children, and can often assist in finding more family members, visiting with the child, provide a home, and more.

Donate Albums

While the donations of scrapbooking supplies has been enormous and we can never say “Thank you” enough. We are in desperate need of albums for all the great supplies and pages donated to the Heart Gallery to be placed in and given to a Foster Child.

DHS has requested pages in 8 1/2 x 11 format, we need albums specifically to accommodate this size of finished pages.

Do you have any unused albums of this size you no longer want or need, consider making a donation for this project! Albums can be directly donated to the Heart Gallery.

You may want to consider making a cash donation to help us purchase the supplies we need at this time. For only $25 we will be able to purchase an 8 1/2 x 11 album, page protectors and adhesive to complete a LifeBook and present it to a Child.

For more information contact:

  • Christy Obie-Barrett
  • Executive Director
  • 541-343-2856
  • Fax 541-343-2866
  • Gail Van Gundy 
  • LifeBook Co-Coordinator
  • 541-525-3500(call or text)

Host Home Collage

Why Do We Need the Host Home Program?

Here in the Eugene/Springfield homelessness is a widespread issue that many organizations have been grappling with for years. In Eugene alone there are over 300 students experiencing homelessness each year -- and these are just the students who come forward.

Youth under the age of 18 are unable to access many food distribution resources, shelters, and resource centers due to their status as a minor. For those between the ages of 18 and 23, the available resources are oftentimes not appropriate and young people can find themselves interacting with populations they have not yet encountered. In order to fill this gap in resources for youth the Host Home Program acts as a safety net for young people experiencing homelessness.

How Does the Host Home Program Work?

AFFEC identifies and certifies volunteers who have space in their homes and in their hearts for a student experiencing homelessness. These Host Homes act as a layer of support by providing a student a safe and reliable home while the continue their education. While Host Home Volunteers are not considered foster parents, they do serve a mentor-like role in the youth’s life by helping him or her gain the life skills needed so they do not fall back into the life of homelessness in the future.

Who Does the Program Serve?

We serve students experiencing homelessness in Eugene/Springfield. The youth we serve are actively attending school, have no history of violence against others and are not in immediate need of medical interventions. What’s more, the program is voluntary -- no youth is ever pressured into becoming a part of the program and they understand that there are expectations should they decide to proceed and agree to those conditions. They have reached out because they want to be safe.

What are the Requirements to Become a Host Home?

Housing providers must:

  • Have an available, private or shared bedroom for the youth that has a bed, a window, and space for them to store their belongings.
  • Have at least one adult, age 26+, who permanently resides in the home.
  • Have smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors.
  • Have either renters or house insurance.
  • Have an economically stable living situation.

What Support Will the Students and Host Homes Receive?

Program participants will be supported throughout the duration of their match by AFFEC and the 15th Night Network. By being connected to the network, AFFEC can help youth get their Oregon ID, SNAP benefits, clothing vouchers, transportation resources, and other necessities.

It is not expected that those taking youth into their homes will take on a heavy financial burden when providing this service.

I Would Like More Information. Who do I Contact?

You can always give us a call at 541-343-2856.
You can also contact out Host Home Director by email at hosthome@afamilyforeverychild.org

Host Home Left

Why Do We Need the Host Home Program?

Here in the Eugene/Springfield homelessness is a widespread issue that many organizations have been grappling with for years. In Eugene alone there are over 300 students experiencing homelessness each year -- and these are just the students who come forward. Youth under the age of 18 are unable to access many food distribution resources, shelters, and resource centers due to their status as a minor. For those between the ages of 18 and 23, the available resources are oftentimes not appropriate and young people can find themselves interacting with populations they have not yet encountered. In order to fill this gap in resources for youth the Host Home Program acts as a safety net for young people experiencing homelessness.

How Does the Host Home Program Work?

AFFEC identifies and certifies volunteers who have space in their homes and in their hearts for a student experiencing homelessness. These Host Homes act as a layer of support by providing a student a safe and reliable home while the continue their education. While Host Home Volunteers are not considered foster parents, they do serve a mentor-like role in the youth’s life by helping him or her gain the life skills needed so they do not fall back into the life of homelessness in the future.

Who Does the Program Serve?

We serve students experiencing homelessness in Eugene/Springfield. The youth we serve are actively attending school, have no history of violence against others and are not in immediate need of medical interventions. What’s more, the program is voluntary -- no youth is ever pressured into becoming a part of the program and they understand that there are expectations should they decide to proceed and agree to those conditions. They have reached out because they want to be safe.

What are the Requirements to Become a Host Home?

Housing providers must:

  • Have an available, private or shared bedroom for the youth that has a bed, a window, and space for them to store their belongings.
  • Have at least one adult, age 26+, who permanently resides in the home.
  • Have smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors.
  • Have either renters or house insurance.
  • Have an economically stable living situation.

What Support Will the Students and Host Homes Receive?

Program participants will be supported throughout the duration of their match by AFFEC and the 15th Night Network. By being connected to the network, AFFEC can help youth get their Oregon ID, SNAP benefits, clothing vouchers, transportation resources, and other necessities. It is not expected that those taking youth into their homes will take on a heavy financial burden when providing this service.

I Would Like More Information. Who do I Contact?

You can always give us a call at 541-343-2856.
You can also contact out Host Home Director by email at hosthome@afamilyforeverychild.org

Host Home Alternating

Why Do We Need the Host Home Program?

Here in the Eugene/Springfield homelessness is a widespread issue that many organizations have been grappling with for years. In Eugene alone there are over 300 students experiencing homelessness each year -- and these are just the students who come forward. Youth under the age of 18 are unable to access many food distribution resources, shelters, and resource centers due to their status as a minor. For those between the ages of 18 and 23, the available resources are oftentimes not appropriate and young people can find themselves interacting with populations they have not yet encountered. In order to fill this gap in resources for youth the Host Home Program acts as a safety net for young people experiencing homelessness.

How Does the Host Home Program Work?

AFFEC identifies and certifies volunteers who have space in their homes and in their hearts for a student experiencing homelessness. These Host Homes act as a layer of support by providing a student a safe and reliable home while the continue their education. While Host Home Volunteers are not considered foster parents, they do serve a mentor-like role in the youth’s life by helping him or her gain the life skills needed so they do not fall back into the life of homelessness in the future.

Who Does the Program Serve?

We serve students experiencing homelessness in Eugene/Springfield. The youth we serve are actively attending school, have no history of violence against others and are not in immediate need of medical interventions. What’s more, the program is voluntary -- no youth is ever pressured into becoming a part of the program and they understand that there are expectations should they decide to proceed and agree to those conditions. They have reached out because they want to be safe.

What are the Requirements to Become a Host Home?

Housing providers must:

  • Have an available, private or shared bedroom for the youth that has a bed, a window, and space for them to store their belongings.
  • Have at least one adult, age 26+, who permanently resides in the home.
  • Have smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors.
  • Have either renters or house insurance.
  • Have an economically stable living situation.

What Support Will the Students and Host Homes Receive?

Program participants will be supported throughout the duration of their match by AFFEC and the 15th Night Network. By being connected to the network, AFFEC can help youth get their Oregon ID, SNAP benefits, clothing vouchers, transportation resources, and other necessities.

It is not expected that those taking youth into their homes will take on a heavy financial burden when providing this service.

I Would Like More Information. Who do I Contact?

You can always give us a call at 541-343-2856.
You can also contact out Host Home Director by email at hosthome@afamilyforeverychild.org

Host Home Text Only

Why Do We Need the Host Home Program?

Here in the Eugene/Springfield homelessness is a widespread issue that many organizations have been grappling with for years. In Eugene alone there are over 300 students experiencing homelessness each year -- and these are just the students who come forward.

Youth under the age of 18 are unable to access many food distribution resources, shelters, and resource centers due to their status as a minor. For those between the ages of 18 and 23, the available resources are oftentimes not appropriate and young people can find themselves interacting with populations they have not yet encountered. In order to fill this gap in resources for youth the Host Home Program acts as a safety net for young people experiencing homelessness.

How Does the Host Home Program Work?

AFFEC identifies and certifies volunteers who have space in their homes and in their hearts for a student experiencing homelessness. These Host Homes act as a layer of support by providing a student a safe and reliable home while the continue their education. While Host Home Volunteers are not considered foster parents, they do serve a mentor-like role in the youth’s life by helping him or her gain the life skills needed so they do not fall back into the life of homelessness in the future.

Who Does the Program Serve?

We serve students experiencing homelessness in Eugene/Springfield. The youth we serve are actively attending school, have no history of violence against others and are not in immediate need of medical interventions. What’s more, the program is voluntary -- no youth is ever pressured into becoming a part of the program and they understand that there are expectations should they decide to proceed and agree to those conditions. They have reached out because they want to be safe.

What are the Requirements to Become a Host Home?

Housing providers must:

  • Have an available, private or shared bedroom for the youth that has a bed, a window, and space for them to store their belongings.
  • Have at least one adult, age 26+, who permanently resides in the home.
  • Have smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors.
  • Have either renters or house insurance.
  • Have an economically stable living situation.

What Support Will the Students and Host Homes Receive?

Program participants will be supported throughout the duration of their match by AFFEC and the 15th Night Network. By being connected to the network, AFFEC can help youth get their Oregon ID, SNAP benefits, clothing vouchers, transportation resources, and other necessities.

It is not expected that those taking youth into their homes will take on a heavy financial burden when providing this service.

I Would Like More Information. Who do I Contact?

You can always give us a call at 541-343-2856.
You can also contact out Host Home Director by email at hosthome@afamilyforeverychild.org

Host Home

Why Do We Need the Host Home Program?

Here in the Eugene/Springfield homelessness is a widespread issue that many organizations have been grappling with for years. In Eugene alone there are over 300 students experiencing homelessness each year -- and these are just the students who come forward. Youth under the age of 18 are unable to access many food distribution resources, shelters, and resource centers due to their status as a minor. For those between the ages of 18 and 23, the available resources are oftentimes not appropriate and young people can find themselves interacting with populations they have not yet encountered. In order to fill this gap in resources for youth the Host Home Program acts as a safety net for young people experiencing homelessness.

How Does the Host Home Program Work?

AFFEC identifies and certifies volunteers who have space in their homes and in their hearts for a student experiencing homelessness. These Host Homes act as a layer of support by providing a student a safe and reliable home while the continue their education. While Host Home Volunteers are not considered foster parents, they do serve a mentor-like role in the youth’s life by helping him or her gain the life skills needed so they do not fall back into the life of homelessness in the future.

Who Does the Program Serve?

We serve students experiencing homelessness in Eugene/Springfield. The youth we serve are actively attending school, have no history of violence against others and are not in immediate need of medical interventions. What’s more, the program is voluntary -- no youth is ever pressured into becoming a part of the program and they understand that there are expectations should they decide to proceed and agree to those conditions. They have reached out because they want to be safe.

What are the Requirements to Become a Host Home?

Housing providers must:

  • Have an available, private or shared bedroom for the youth that has a bed, a window, and space for them to store their belongings.
  • Have at least one adult, age 26+, who permanently resides in the home.
  • Have smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors.
  • Have either renters or house insurance.
  • Have an economically stable living situation.

What Support Will the Students and Host Homes Receive?

Program participants will be supported throughout the duration of their match by AFFEC and the 15th Night Network. By being connected to the network, AFFEC can help youth get their Oregon ID, SNAP benefits, clothing vouchers, transportation resources, and other necessities. It is not expected that those taking youth into their homes will take on a heavy financial burden when providing this service.

I Would Like More Information. Who do I Contact?

You can always give us a call at 541-343-2856.
You can also contact out Host Home Director by email at hosthome@afamilyforeverychild.org

Child Matching Events

What is it?

In a Child Matching Event, social workers are given the opportunity to present their child/children to an audience of home study approved families. The advantage that a Child Matching Event creates is the opportunity for a social worker to expand on and discuss their child in further detail toward families who have interest in the child.

Social Workers

  • Identify your child/children who you wish to present towards potential home study families. Get involved by contacting our Recruitment Coordinator for available dates.
  • Gather media (pictures, videos, audio clips, etc.) that represent your child(ren). High-quality media and a good variety are valuable towards the presentation of the child.
  • Prepare for questions that families might ask during the webinar. Review the child’s case files and identify what the child needs in a forever family. It is also important that workers share the strengths of the children along with their struggles. If possible find the contact information for others in the child’s life such as a CASA, mentor, or a foster parent who cares for them. A Family For Every Child can coordinate with these individuals to also participate in the webinar.
  • Schedule a practice event in order to test audio and ensure that the event goes smoothly the day of. At the specific date and time of the event, log on from your computer and be prepared to discuss the child you are presenting. Log on instructions and all needed info will be sent to you days prior to the event. Be prepared to answer questions about the child, as families viewing the presentation have the ability to type questions they may have.
  • Following the conclusion of the webinar, families will have the opportunity to submit their home study. Please be prepared to follow up with interested families and discuss with them if they are a good potential fit for the child, or why they may not be.

Families

Child Matching Events give families the opportunity to learn more about a child that they have some interest in. The advantage in these events comes from the ability to ask any questions towards the social worker and receive immediate responses. Further information on the child is presented by the social worker as well. This is often information that goes beyond a child’s bio.

The interaction through questions during the webinar are valuable for both families and social workers, as families are allowed to ask all potential questions anonymously and social workers can effectively provide information on their child in a time-efficient manner.

Any families who are interested in attending a Child Matching Event webinar must be a home study approved family. Only Adoption Workers and families with completed home studies will be approved to attend these events due to the personal and detailed information that will be provided about the children during the event. All home study families interested in a Child Matching Event will need to pre-register for the specific event that they wish to be involved in.