15th Night

Homelessness is an issue felt across the country. Here in the Eugene/Springfield, homelessness is a wide-spread issue that many organizations have been grappling with for years. With the ever increasing population in the Eugene/Springfield areas, the housing market has become more competitive, which has increased rent, utility costs, and availability of housing. Although the population experiencing homelessness has remained relatively consistent throughout the last few years, waiting lists for subsidized housing and housing assistance programs continue to grow longer and longer. Many people turn to the Eugene Mission to seek temporary housing, especially during the cold winter months. However, if you are an unaccompanied youth and you are experiencing homelessness, gaining access to resources is more difficult. Youth under the age of 18 are unable to access many food distribution resources, shelters, and resource centers due to their status as a minor. For those between the ages of 18 and 23, the available resources are oftentimes not appropriate and young people can find themselves interacting with populations they have not encountered yet. In order to fill this gap in resources for youth, the 15th Night has created a community coalition that acts as a safety net for young people experiencing homelessness. The 15th Night is a broad community partnership designed to prevent youth from going out on the street and to intervene quickly if they do. Instead of creating a new 501(c)3, the 15th Night created a coalition of existing non-profits, businesses, and community leaders all focused on providing services to work on prevention and intervention. The 15th Night has created organizational objectives for the coalition:
  • Reduce youth dropout rates due to homelessness
  • Inform our community and youth of the dangers street life can bring
  • Create a culture of caring throughout our community towards at-risk youth
  • Help our community to better understand what their participation could do for a homeless youth
  • Create accessibility for homeless youth in regards to community resources and assistance

How Does AFFEC Fit into the Network?

A Family For Every Child will be providing three services to the 15th Night network: mentoring, family finding, and host homes. AFFEC has been providing both mentoring and family finding to the community for almost a decade, however the host homes is a new program that was created to fill the housing gap in our community. To learn more about ... We are also looking for community members to join the movement and volunteer in a number of ways. If you are interested in volunteering in either capacity:
  • Fill out a volunteer application.
  • Select the appropriate boxes for either mentor, family finding volunteer, or host home.

Host Homes

Having a safe and stable place to call home is an immeasurably important resource that many of us take for granted. AFFEC will providing homes for youth referred to the 15th Night network, who are maintaining regular attendance at school, so they can experience this necessity, while completing their secondary education. The host home matching system is mirrored after that of our mentoring program, in that it matches youth with volunteers on a strengths and needs basis. These homes are split into two categories- short term and long term. Short term housing providers will house a youth as they enter the program, for up to 30 days, unless a bond is formed between the pair. While staying in this home, the youth will work with AFFEC to determine who can provide them with the most successful long term placement. The long term housing providers will house the youth for the duration of the high school career. This sounds like a big commitment and it is. Housing providers are not allotted monthly stipends for supporting the youth and they assume a parental role in the relationship. However, the pair will be supported throughout the duration of their match by AFFEC and the 15th Night network. By being connected to the network, AFFEC can help youth get their Oregon ID, food stamps, clothing vouchers, and other necessities. It is not expected that those taking youth into their homes will take on a heavy financial burden when providing this service. However, we do have certain requirements to be a host home. Housing providers must:
  • Have an available, private bedroom for the youth that has a bed, a window, and space for them to store their belongings.
  • Have at least one adult, age 26+, who permanently resides in the home.
  • Have smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors.
  • Have either renters or house insurance.
  • Have an economically stable living situation.
If you believe that you could provide a youth in need with a place in your home, AFFEC encourages you to apply. The process for becoming one of our housing providers is as follows:
  1. Fill out a volunteer application. If you are looking at the form and Host Home is not listed, fill out the mentor portion of the application and indicate that you are applying for Host Homes.
  2. Complete a background check and pass a sex offender registry check.
  3. Pass a reference check. You will provide 4 references in your volunteer application that the program director will contact individually.
  4. Have a home study completed. This involves a member of the AFFEC staff asking you a series of questions and touring your home.
  5. Complete the orientation period which includes 16 hours of training at our office and online. You also will need CPR and Medication certification.
If you have any additional questions regarding the program, do not hesitate in contacting: Permanency Director permanency@afamilyforeverychild.org (541) 343-2856 1675 W 11th Ave. Eugene, OR 97402

Family Preservation Program

There are families in our community at risk for child abuse and/or neglect. These families need guidance to move on from the past and into the next chapter of their lives, learning how to make positive changes for themselves and their families.

What is the FAMILY PRESERVATION PROGRAM?

AFFEC's Family Preservation Program focuses on keeping the family unit together. We believe these early and often preventative steps can make the difference between a family successfully parenting their children and losing them to the foster care system. Effective family preservation efforts could keep many children from the trauma of entering foster care. AFFEC utilizes informal (self-referrals and community partners) and formal (DHS) referral processes, as well as AFFEC's own programs to identify families in need.

AFFEC's Family Preservation Program is an intervention and prevention program that is both culturally responsive and community-based. Through this program, parents and their children/youth become empowered to create positive and long term changes for their families.

AFFEC's Family Preservation Program utilizes mutual support (the giving and getting of help). Parent mentors lead by example to achieve personal growth, improve family functioning, and achieve parental and child/youth resilience.

Our Family Preservation and Parent Mentor program works with families to bring about constructive change through support, guidance, instruction and training. The ultimate goal is to maintain children safely at home in order to spare them the trauma of separation.

Keeping the Family Unit Together

Parents are looking for a supportive, non-judgmental environment to learn new parenting strategies and develop leadership and advocacy skills for their families.   AFFEC recognizes the strengths and knowledge of families and the key role they play in the lives of not only their own family members, but in the lives of other families on a similar journey.

AFFEC's Family Preservation Program   is a Parent Mentor Program that supports families connecting with one another throughout the community.   This program pairs parents with trained mentors who can provide support, encouragement, and information on ways to advocate for your child and family.

At present, the Family Preservation program is generally available only in Lane County, Oregon because of budget and resource limitations. We are interested in expanding the program in cost-effective ways; if you or your organization are interested in helping to expand it, please get in touch!

It Takes a Village and Neighbors Help Neighbors

Every day mentors use their time and their gifts to strengthen families and communities. What we are offering is the gift of time; a hand up rather than a handout. Money can help in many different ways as we are all aware; taking time to empower individuals and give them the tools to become better parents to a child who is part of our community is priceless. Many work hard to deal with the challenges of environments where unemployment, violence, and drugs are taking their toll. In the face of these obstacles, community residents look for the connections to vital resources to improve their odds of succeeding. How important and valuable is the simple gift of friendship? How rewarding would it be to pass on valuable life skills to a person or family in need of a hand up to the next step in life?

Parent Mentors

Matches are based on the needs expressed by the family, so each family is able to determine the kind of mentor they need.

We work with families as a team to see to it that the family is provided services and training (e.g., job training, job search assistance, housing, anger management training, and respite care). There is monthly reporting and interaction with all the members of the team. Qualitative outcomes we seek include strengthening parent-child attachment, at risk families and others marginalized by the system. The Parent Mentor Team is made up of clinical staff, case managers and Parent Mentor who provide individual and group treatment to parents, their children and other family members. Services are provided in the family's home as well as in community settings.

Mentor Program

Mentor Program Mission Statement

The mission of A Family For Every Child's Mentor Program is to unite foster care and at-risk youth in our community with enthusiastic, dedicated, and caring adults who can provide friendship and encouragement while supporting them through life’s various transitions, instilling independence and ultimately building long lasting bonds.

Program Goals

Since the Mentor Program’s inception in 2007, the vision of the program has been to connect youth with positive members of their community to build friendships and have role models who:

  • Provide youth with support and guidance
  • Provide the youth with someone to call and hang out  "just because."
  • Provide a potentially permanent bond for the youth.
  • Teach independent living/life skills, instill creativity, and promote the youth's self esteem.

Who We Serve

A Family For Every Child’s Mentor Program serves Oregon youth in Lane County, the greater Portland area, and other areas of Western Oregon. We serve children who are at risk and in need of permanent connections due to being in foster care or have been exposed to experience that could hinder their full potential.

How Do I Refer My Youth?

Parents, caseworkers, aunts, uncles, grandparents, foster parents... almost anyone can refer a youth! A pillar of our program is that all youth participation is voluntary -- every youth in our program is in it because they want to be and no youth shall ever be forced to have a mentor. Know a youth who needs mentor?

What Does A Mentor Do?

There aren’t any typical mentor matches as we don’t have typical youth or mentors. The beauty of A Family For Every Child’s Mentor Program is that it allows for each mentor match to be distinctive. Mentors and youth are matched based upon their mutual interests, not by numbers on a waiting list. Your mentor experience will be as unique as you are! What are your interests? What are your passions? What do you like to do to pass the time? Mentoring is so easy because all you have to do is include your youth in the things you already like to do!

How Do I Become A Mentor?

Becoming a mentor doesn’t have to be a daunting process. Most mentors are matched within six weeks of submitting their application! You’ll find that it’s easier than ever to make a difference in a youth’s life.

Sports and Outdoors Mentor Program

Designed for our male youth, the Sports and Outdoor Mentor Program makes mentoring more accessible than ever. With a focus on physical activities, lower mentor age requirement and shorter 6 month commitment period, we're breaking down the barriers of male mentoring and creating new possibilities for youth who typically wait longer for their very own mentors

Non Traditional Mentor Program

New for Fall 2019, our NTMP places our Volunteers in specific locations within Lane County. We are kicking off the new program at the Eugene Library and area middle and high schools. Volunteers will be available in the Teen Center  / Family Resource Rooms to meet with youth for homework support, conversation, play a game of cards, etc. It is our belief that organic connections will be made.  After establishing a relationship with a youth for several months, transitioning to our traditional Mentor Program is always an option.

Requirements include :

  • 19 + yrs old
  • 2-3 hours , once or twice a week
  • Complete our Volunteer application including 3 references / background check

Host Home Collage

Why Do We Need the Host Home Program?

Here in the Eugene/Springfield homelessness is a widespread issue that many organizations have been grappling with for years. In Eugene alone there are over 300 students experiencing homelessness each year -- and these are just the students who come forward.

Youth under the age of 18 are unable to access many food distribution resources, shelters, and resource centers due to their status as a minor. For those between the ages of 18 and 23, the available resources are oftentimes not appropriate and young people can find themselves interacting with populations they have not yet encountered. In order to fill this gap in resources for youth the Host Home Program acts as a safety net for young people experiencing homelessness.

How Does the Host Home Program Work?

AFFEC identifies and certifies volunteers who have space in their homes and in their hearts for a student experiencing homelessness. These Host Homes act as a layer of support by providing a student a safe and reliable home while the continue their education. While Host Home Volunteers are not considered foster parents, they do serve a mentor-like role in the youth’s life by helping him or her gain the life skills needed so they do not fall back into the life of homelessness in the future.

Who Does the Program Serve?

We serve students experiencing homelessness in Eugene/Springfield. The youth we serve are actively attending school, have no history of violence against others and are not in immediate need of medical interventions. What’s more, the program is voluntary -- no youth is ever pressured into becoming a part of the program and they understand that there are expectations should they decide to proceed and agree to those conditions. They have reached out because they want to be safe.

What are the Requirements to Become a Host Home?

Housing providers must:

  • Have an available, private or shared bedroom for the youth that has a bed, a window, and space for them to store their belongings.
  • Have at least one adult, age 26+, who permanently resides in the home.
  • Have smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors.
  • Have either renters or house insurance.
  • Have an economically stable living situation.

What Support Will the Students and Host Homes Receive?

Program participants will be supported throughout the duration of their match by AFFEC and the 15th Night Network. By being connected to the network, AFFEC can help youth get their Oregon ID, SNAP benefits, clothing vouchers, transportation resources, and other necessities.

It is not expected that those taking youth into their homes will take on a heavy financial burden when providing this service.

I Would Like More Information. Who do I Contact?

You can always give us a call at 541-343-2856.
You can also contact out Host Home Director by email at hosthome@afamilyforeverychild.org

Host Home Left

Why Do We Need the Host Home Program?

Here in the Eugene/Springfield homelessness is a widespread issue that many organizations have been grappling with for years. In Eugene alone there are over 300 students experiencing homelessness each year -- and these are just the students who come forward. Youth under the age of 18 are unable to access many food distribution resources, shelters, and resource centers due to their status as a minor. For those between the ages of 18 and 23, the available resources are oftentimes not appropriate and young people can find themselves interacting with populations they have not yet encountered. In order to fill this gap in resources for youth the Host Home Program acts as a safety net for young people experiencing homelessness.

How Does the Host Home Program Work?

AFFEC identifies and certifies volunteers who have space in their homes and in their hearts for a student experiencing homelessness. These Host Homes act as a layer of support by providing a student a safe and reliable home while the continue their education. While Host Home Volunteers are not considered foster parents, they do serve a mentor-like role in the youth’s life by helping him or her gain the life skills needed so they do not fall back into the life of homelessness in the future.

Who Does the Program Serve?

We serve students experiencing homelessness in Eugene/Springfield. The youth we serve are actively attending school, have no history of violence against others and are not in immediate need of medical interventions. What’s more, the program is voluntary -- no youth is ever pressured into becoming a part of the program and they understand that there are expectations should they decide to proceed and agree to those conditions. They have reached out because they want to be safe.

What are the Requirements to Become a Host Home?

Housing providers must:

  • Have an available, private or shared bedroom for the youth that has a bed, a window, and space for them to store their belongings.
  • Have at least one adult, age 26+, who permanently resides in the home.
  • Have smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors.
  • Have either renters or house insurance.
  • Have an economically stable living situation.

What Support Will the Students and Host Homes Receive?

Program participants will be supported throughout the duration of their match by AFFEC and the 15th Night Network. By being connected to the network, AFFEC can help youth get their Oregon ID, SNAP benefits, clothing vouchers, transportation resources, and other necessities. It is not expected that those taking youth into their homes will take on a heavy financial burden when providing this service.

I Would Like More Information. Who do I Contact?

You can always give us a call at 541-343-2856.
You can also contact out Host Home Director by email at hosthome@afamilyforeverychild.org

Host Home Alternating

Why Do We Need the Host Home Program?

Here in the Eugene/Springfield homelessness is a widespread issue that many organizations have been grappling with for years. In Eugene alone there are over 300 students experiencing homelessness each year -- and these are just the students who come forward. Youth under the age of 18 are unable to access many food distribution resources, shelters, and resource centers due to their status as a minor. For those between the ages of 18 and 23, the available resources are oftentimes not appropriate and young people can find themselves interacting with populations they have not yet encountered. In order to fill this gap in resources for youth the Host Home Program acts as a safety net for young people experiencing homelessness.

How Does the Host Home Program Work?

AFFEC identifies and certifies volunteers who have space in their homes and in their hearts for a student experiencing homelessness. These Host Homes act as a layer of support by providing a student a safe and reliable home while the continue their education. While Host Home Volunteers are not considered foster parents, they do serve a mentor-like role in the youth’s life by helping him or her gain the life skills needed so they do not fall back into the life of homelessness in the future.

Who Does the Program Serve?

We serve students experiencing homelessness in Eugene/Springfield. The youth we serve are actively attending school, have no history of violence against others and are not in immediate need of medical interventions. What’s more, the program is voluntary -- no youth is ever pressured into becoming a part of the program and they understand that there are expectations should they decide to proceed and agree to those conditions. They have reached out because they want to be safe.

What are the Requirements to Become a Host Home?

Housing providers must:

  • Have an available, private or shared bedroom for the youth that has a bed, a window, and space for them to store their belongings.
  • Have at least one adult, age 26+, who permanently resides in the home.
  • Have smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors.
  • Have either renters or house insurance.
  • Have an economically stable living situation.

What Support Will the Students and Host Homes Receive?

Program participants will be supported throughout the duration of their match by AFFEC and the 15th Night Network. By being connected to the network, AFFEC can help youth get their Oregon ID, SNAP benefits, clothing vouchers, transportation resources, and other necessities.

It is not expected that those taking youth into their homes will take on a heavy financial burden when providing this service.

I Would Like More Information. Who do I Contact?

You can always give us a call at 541-343-2856.
You can also contact out Host Home Director by email at hosthome@afamilyforeverychild.org

Host Home Text Only

Why Do We Need the Host Home Program?

Here in the Eugene/Springfield homelessness is a widespread issue that many organizations have been grappling with for years. In Eugene alone there are over 300 students experiencing homelessness each year -- and these are just the students who come forward.

Youth under the age of 18 are unable to access many food distribution resources, shelters, and resource centers due to their status as a minor. For those between the ages of 18 and 23, the available resources are oftentimes not appropriate and young people can find themselves interacting with populations they have not yet encountered. In order to fill this gap in resources for youth the Host Home Program acts as a safety net for young people experiencing homelessness.

How Does the Host Home Program Work?

AFFEC identifies and certifies volunteers who have space in their homes and in their hearts for a student experiencing homelessness. These Host Homes act as a layer of support by providing a student a safe and reliable home while the continue their education. While Host Home Volunteers are not considered foster parents, they do serve a mentor-like role in the youth’s life by helping him or her gain the life skills needed so they do not fall back into the life of homelessness in the future.

Who Does the Program Serve?

We serve students experiencing homelessness in Eugene/Springfield. The youth we serve are actively attending school, have no history of violence against others and are not in immediate need of medical interventions. What’s more, the program is voluntary -- no youth is ever pressured into becoming a part of the program and they understand that there are expectations should they decide to proceed and agree to those conditions. They have reached out because they want to be safe.

What are the Requirements to Become a Host Home?

Housing providers must:

  • Have an available, private or shared bedroom for the youth that has a bed, a window, and space for them to store their belongings.
  • Have at least one adult, age 26+, who permanently resides in the home.
  • Have smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors.
  • Have either renters or house insurance.
  • Have an economically stable living situation.

What Support Will the Students and Host Homes Receive?

Program participants will be supported throughout the duration of their match by AFFEC and the 15th Night Network. By being connected to the network, AFFEC can help youth get their Oregon ID, SNAP benefits, clothing vouchers, transportation resources, and other necessities.

It is not expected that those taking youth into their homes will take on a heavy financial burden when providing this service.

I Would Like More Information. Who do I Contact?

You can always give us a call at 541-343-2856.
You can also contact out Host Home Director by email at hosthome@afamilyforeverychild.org

Host Home

Why Do We Need the Host Home Program?

Here in the Eugene/Springfield homelessness is a widespread issue that many organizations have been grappling with for years. In Eugene alone there are over 300 students experiencing homelessness each year -- and these are just the students who come forward. Youth under the age of 18 are unable to access many food distribution resources, shelters, and resource centers due to their status as a minor. For those between the ages of 18 and 23, the available resources are oftentimes not appropriate and young people can find themselves interacting with populations they have not yet encountered. In order to fill this gap in resources for youth the Host Home Program acts as a safety net for young people experiencing homelessness.

How Does the Host Home Program Work?

AFFEC identifies and certifies volunteers who have space in their homes and in their hearts for a student experiencing homelessness. These Host Homes act as a layer of support by providing a student a safe and reliable home while the continue their education. While Host Home Volunteers are not considered foster parents, they do serve a mentor-like role in the youth’s life by helping him or her gain the life skills needed so they do not fall back into the life of homelessness in the future.

Who Does the Program Serve?

We serve students experiencing homelessness in Eugene/Springfield. The youth we serve are actively attending school, have no history of violence against others and are not in immediate need of medical interventions. What’s more, the program is voluntary -- no youth is ever pressured into becoming a part of the program and they understand that there are expectations should they decide to proceed and agree to those conditions. They have reached out because they want to be safe.

What are the Requirements to Become a Host Home?

Housing providers must:

  • Have an available, private or shared bedroom for the youth that has a bed, a window, and space for them to store their belongings.
  • Have at least one adult, age 26+, who permanently resides in the home.
  • Have smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors.
  • Have either renters or house insurance.
  • Have an economically stable living situation.

What Support Will the Students and Host Homes Receive?

Program participants will be supported throughout the duration of their match by AFFEC and the 15th Night Network. By being connected to the network, AFFEC can help youth get their Oregon ID, SNAP benefits, clothing vouchers, transportation resources, and other necessities. It is not expected that those taking youth into their homes will take on a heavy financial burden when providing this service.

I Would Like More Information. Who do I Contact?

You can always give us a call at 541-343-2856.
You can also contact out Host Home Director by email at hosthome@afamilyforeverychild.org

15th Night / Host Home Overview

Why we need you!

Our Host home program is an innovative and scalable effort that could move the needle for Homeless Students. It will save money and lives, but will take a team.

Reasons you should be involved!

  • Youth who are “new” to our streets are more likely to become chronically homeless if we do not intervene within 15 nights.
  • 68.4% of homeless students scored below standards, 82.3% of homeless students scored below standard in math, and 60.4% of homeless students scored below standard in science.
  • Youth that have experienced homelessness have a 50% higher chance of not having a high school diploma, than youth that have not had the experience. It is our goal to develop this program to interrupt this cycle and produce education and personal successes for 50 of these homeless youth.
  • In 2017, we had 325 Bethel-Eugene 4J youth experiencing homelessness and identified as unaccompanied minors—90 dropped out of school.
  • For every $1 spent on youth interventions that address homelessness, the community saves $4.12 according to a New Avenues for Youth study (Portland, Oregon 2010).
  • Oregon estimates that 24,000 unaccompanied youth experience homelessness each year in Oregon.
  • National studies indicate that most of these youth run away due to family conflict or abuse, while others are kicked out of their home or "thrown away‟.
  • We are getting results-The percentage of unaccompanied students compared to the total number of homeless students in the 4J and Bethel school districts dropped from 26.3% in the 2013-2014 school year to 23.7% in the 2016-2017 school year.
  • Last school year, 15th Night Rapid Access Network (RAN) Advocates sent alerts on behalf of 162 unaccompanied students with a total of 292 services and resource requested. The most common requests were for basic needs like clothing and shoes, food and shelter. As of the end of the year, 30 local, youth-serving organizations (“providers”) were responding to unaccompanied student needs via the 15th Night Rapid Access Network (RAN).

What is 15th Night?

One night on the street is too many. The 15th Night is a community-wide partnership that helps more than 480 of our Eugene-Springfield students who are navigating school and life alone, without a permanent place to spend the night.  Bringing together existing community resources, the 15th Night focuses these resources on the safety and well-being of our vulnerable Eugene-Springfield youth who do not have a parent or guardian to support them. These resource teams include at least one representative from the University of Oregon, Bethel School District, Lane County Health and Human Services, the Eugene Police Department, City Councilor Ward 8, Eugene City Manager, Lane ESD, Eugene 4J School District, as well as over 30 area nonprofits.

Our latest effort is to work with individual High schools and their feeder middle schools on creating their own internal response team for homeless youth within their school, referred to as the School Mobilization Model.  Our Host home program is at the core of engaging the school’s parent and teacher community, as well as local neighborhood groups and business, to wrap services and support all around these youth.  We believe this is a program/effort that is innovative and could be reproduced in any community.

What is the Host Home Program?

Here in the Eugene/Springfield, homelessness is a wide-spread issue that many organizations have been grappling with for years.  Many people turn to the Eugene Mission or other shelters in our community, to seek temporary housing, especially during the cold winter months. However, if you are an unaccompanied youth and you are experiencing homelessness, you do not have access to Adult Shelters, leaving youth with 7 beds at the one shelter we have for under 18, if they can get in, or sleeping on the street. Youth under the age of 18 are also unable to access many food distribution resources and resource centers due to their status as a minor.

Having a safe and stable place to call home is an immeasurably important resource that many of us take for granted. AFFEC will is providing homes for students referred to the 15th Night network, who are maintaining regular attendance at school, so they can experience this necessity, while completing their secondary education. These homes are split into two categories- short term and long term. Short term housing providers will house a youth as they enter the program, for up to 30 days, unless a bond is formed between the pair. While staying in this home, the youth will work with AFFEC to determine who can provide them with the most successful long term placement. The long term housing providers will house the youth for the duration of their high school career.

This sounds like a big commitment and it is. Housing providers are not allotted monthly stipends for supporting the youth and they assume a parental role in the relationship. However, the pair will be supported throughout the duration of their match by AFFEC and the 15th Night network, by being connected to the network.

AFFEC is licensed through the state of Oregon.  As the only licensed Host home program in the state, we have an advantage to serve all ages, all background with no geographic barriers.  Because we have successfully completed the licensing process we are also very committed to assisting other blooming Host home programs throughout the state.

The RAN technology was updated over the summer based on feedback from our community advocates and network of 30+ service providers. RAN 2.0 was successfully launched in late September and enables school specific RANs to be connected to the larger Community RAN.

The 15th Night expanded into Springfield this fall. Springfield Public Schools and the Springfield Police Department can now access the 15th Night RAN on behalf of students experiencing homelessness. Catholic Community Services, First Place Family Shelter, Whitebird Dental and the Eugene Mission have all joined the 30+ network of providers who responded in real time to the 292 alerts for help this year.

Sometimes the 15th Night Network is unable to meet a specific need of a student. This is where our Community Responder volunteers step into action. Over 50 people have volunteered receive alerts from the 15th Night when there is a need that is hard to fill like special clothing, shoes or gift cards for food.

Even students are stepping up for each other.  The Economic Justice League (EJL) for homeless and economically-challenged youth, created with in South Eugene High School.  Along with 15th Night, we are working to execute the vision of keeping kids in school and supporting those struggling with housing.  One of South Eugene’s projects is opening a drop-in center for students to get help, support, and access to resources.  This includes food throughout the school day as well as free dinners-to-go, access to computers and technology, washer and dryer, free counseling, and much more. The goal is to have this room open before school, during lunch, and after school for any student that needs support. We hope to bring in therapists, artists, performers, hair stylists, barbers, and mentors of all kinds. We plan to have Fancy Dinner nights, Hair/Makeup/Makeover nights, Open Mic/Performance nights, arts and crafts, movie and game nights, and more.

Working Together to Protect our Youth

15th Night Rapid Access Network Community Partners are working together to safeguard more than 480 Eugene-Springfield students who do not have a parent or guardian to support them, or a permanent place to call home. With thanks to their involvement, the 15th Night community movement can prevent Eugene-Springfield youth from going out on the street, and intervene quickly if they do.  This partnership includes many state / government resource and over 30 community nonprofits that all make a commitment to work together.

Refer a Mentor

Know someone who would make a great mentor? Send them our way!

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