Can You Directly Adopt Children in Foster Care?

Can You Directly Adopt Children in Foster Care?

Image from UnsplashCan You Adopt Directly Through Foster Care or Do You Have to Foster First?The answer is yes and only on paper. While foster care exists as a temporary place for children to be safe, not all children in the system go back to their biological families. People, like me, adopted directly through foster care and there are still thousands of children waiting for more people to do the same for them.We Need Adoptive FamiliesMaybe you’re like me and the thought of a child(ren) potentially leaving you doesn’t make you run to get involved in the foster care system. I didn’t want that to be my reality either. That’s why I got licensed to adopt children directly from the system. Be Clear On Your IntentIf your intent is to adopt children, then adopt children. If your intent is to foster and care for a child(ren) temporarily, foster. Please do

How Can I Help? Ways to Get Involved in Foster Care

Image from PixabayHow Can I Help? Ways to Get Involved in Foster CareAdopting is a huge responsibility. Not only are adoptive families responsible for their foster child, but they also have the task of ensuring that their new member of the family has the happy and healthy life that they deserve. However, many believe that the only way to help children in need is to adopt, and this is far from the truth. There are many tools, events, and resources accessible to anyone who wants to make a difference in the lives of foster children without carrying the heavy responsibility that comes with adoption. Here are a few lesser-known but equally helpful ways that you can help foster children:  My NeighborIncorporated by the people over at Every Child Oregon, My NeighbOR is an amazing resource to help foster children. People connected to the foster care services can post their needs

Self-Advocacy in the Adoption Process

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Hopeful adoptive parents can take action to increase their chances of getting matched. Tanya F., her husband, and their 8-year-old son began their adoption process of two years in June 2017 by attending a meeting/matching event to gather information about the process and available local children. “We’d been talking about adopting an older child from foster care for several years, and it finally felt like the right time in our lives to jump all in,” she said. “Little did we know what a long journey it would be.”That journey was one, like so many others, spotted with waiting, hoping, and disappointments. Above those things, though, it was one of self-advocacy and action. The adoption world is filled with many interests: the state, the birth family, foster parents, the children themselves, and the professionals trying to assist each of these groups. The more proactive hopeful parents can be, the higher the chances of