Age Appropriate Therapies for Foster Children

Age Appropriate Therapies for Foster Children

 No matter what type of situation a foster child has come from, they have the potential to thrive in a loving and nurturing home. Therapy gives a foster child the ability to regain lost ground. The most potent forms of therapy have an underlying theme of self-empowerment. Depending on the age of the child and what needs to be addressed, these methods may be used together.Cognitive-Behavioral TherapyCognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) takes into consideration the way the child is thinking and works with them to build new behaviors. This form of therapy is best for older children who can sit and communicate effectively. It works to promote emotional growth. Your foster child will be able to learn to understand the intense emotions including those that are attached to past events. From there they can practice how to control those feelings more effectively. Instead of displaying defiant behaviors, a child can begin to use other

Life Lessons to Teach Your Foster Child

Whether you are fostering or adopting a child, once of the biggest questions you will undoubtedly ask yourself is: what life skills and values  you would like to instill in them? While it is true that all children have their own talents, interests, and outlooks on life, there are important lessons that nearly everyone can take with them in their adulthood. Take time to think about the things that matter to you and the extent to which specific skills or behaviors have helped you, and try to synthesize this into a small but valuable list. If you need a little inspiration, perhaps the following life lessons can be of help.Being a Team PlayerWhile independence and learning to stand on your own two feet are crucial for your health and happiness, most scenarios in your child’s life will involve working in a team – including school sports, friendship groups, and work settings. Even being in a relationship

#NationalFosterCareMonth: Why Children End Up in Foster Care

By Aurora
May is Foster Care Awareness Month. While most people are, in fact, aware of foster care, not everyone knows exactly how it works, or more importantly, why it exists. A Family for Every Child works to place foster care children in forever homes if they cannot be reunited with their families. But how do the children we represent end up in foster care in the first place?Foster care becomes necessary when children are not receiving the best possible care in their own homes. There are numerous reasons why a social worker ? would feel that foster care is the safest place for a child. Below are a few of the top reasons children are placed in foster care, as identified on  adoption.com.1. AbuseIf it is discovered that a parent is physically or sexually abusing their child(ren) ?, the child may be taken by child-protective services ? and if there are no relatives available to care for them, they

The Academic Achievement Gap of Foster Children

It is common for foster and adopted children to struggle academically. In fact, it is almost expected. This should be no surprise to any experienced social worker or foster parent.In the U.S., nearly every foster child receives an Individualized Education Program (IEP) at school. An IEP is a program designed to improve a child’s academics through additional special services. For a lot of new foster/adoption parents, the term “special,” when it comes to education, is unsettling. When I first became a Family Adoption Specialist here at A Family For Every Child I associated IEP with learning disabilities. While conducting my first few child searches, I noticed that the majority of children in the foster care system have an IEP. This confused me. I thought, “Is there some psychological factor behind foster children and learning disabilities?; there is obviously a correlation between the two.” So I dug in a little deeper

The Basics on Foster Care

There is an abundance of information on the internet regarding practically any topic one can think of. The information about foster care available on the internet is plentiful and easy to access for perspective foster parents, foster children, individuals seeking volunteer opportunities, and more. Here is a list of websites to visit as a starting point for a research trail on foster care: 1.) “Resources for the Community” at childwelfare.gov Every May, or National Foster Care Month, childwelfare.org posts a list of resources for people to learn more about foster care. These lists include information on how to become a foster parent, as well as how to contribute to the positive development of children in the foster care system. For 2015, look for article titles such as, “Becoming a Foster Parent” from the National Foster Parent Association, “Is Fostering a Good Fit For Us? Things To Consider” from the Foster Care

See The Faces of Foster Care

A slideshow published by The New York Times that provides an inside look at the various “faces” of foster care. This piece of multimedia work looks at the foster children population of California. Nine different faces are showcased describing their background in foster care and where they are in their lives today. http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2013/11/03/education/edlife/20131103FOSTER-10.html

How to Help Foster Children in Your Community

Often the holiday season is associated with volunteer work and the generosity of individuals to help their communities. However, the need for volunteers, donations, and more exists 365 days of the year, and with so many options to choose from, giving back, particularly to foster children, is easier than ever. This back to school season check out the number of donation drives that are available nationwide, as well as locally in the Eugene area. 1.) Bring any donations that include school supplies, athletic shoes and apparel for physical education classes, and other clothing for the back to school season to any Sleep Country in the Northwest. More than 20,000 children in Oregon and Washington find themselves in the foster care system and many enter with few possessions. Visit http://www.sleepcountry.com/sleep-country-foster-kids.html for more information. 2.) With treehouseforkids.org, the opportunity to create and host your own back to school donation drive is readily available. As

The Invisible Achievement Gap: Students in Foster Care

By: Marian Wright Edelman President Children’s Defense Fund Across the country it’s back to school time. I hope it is a year full of promise and not disappointment and added stress for all children — especially those most vulnerable. I also hope this school year begins with a renewed commitment by all teachers and school administrators to help every child succeed. Every year too many children don’t get the respect and extra help they need to reach their full potential. Children of color, poor children, English learners, and children with disabilities are especially likely to be left behind. And there is another group of children — those in foster care — whose special needs too often are ignored. Many school districts do not even know which students are in foster care and are not tracking their performance. So now I am grateful that in California findings about educational outcomes for public school